Kevin Bacon Reveals How He Got His Big Break

Actor and musician Kevin Bacon talks with GQ Editor-at-Large Michael Hainey about the sacrifices he made as an 18-year-old to earn his big break in “Animal House.”

Released on 8/18/2015

Credits

Starring: Kevin Bacon and Michael Hainey

Transcript

00:11
I'm going to start at the beginning with you because
00:15
I want you to put us in a time machine,
00:17
take us back to late 70s,
00:21
you're 18 years old, you moved to New York,
00:24
and what happens?
00:26
Yeah, it's a crazy time machine to be in
00:30
for a lot of reasons.
00:32
I was in Philly in 1976, which was the bicentennial
00:39
of the American Revolution.
00:42
Philadelphia, my hometown, was getting very excited
00:46
about this thing that was about to happen.
00:50
That Liberty Bell thing?
00:51
The Liberty Bell thing, exactly.
00:53
I had gotten out of high school in January
00:57
by doing sort of an accelerated program.
01:02
I was working in a warehouse,
01:07
packing and shipping medical books,
01:10
which was really dull work, except for the the fact that
01:14
some of the guys would say,
01:15
You got to check out this one.
01:16
There is a disgusting skin disease in this,
01:19
and you absolutely have to see.
01:21
You turn to page 335.
01:23
There would be a photograph of the most disgusting thing
01:27
that you've ever seen in your life.
01:29
That's what I was doing in order to make a couple of bucks.
01:32
I knew that I wanted to be an actor,
01:35
but I didn't really know what to do,
01:37
how to do that or what to do with my life at that point.
01:42
I got involved with a Philadelphia theater group
01:50
that was going to put on
01:51
an alternative slightly-hippy musical
01:56
about the bicentennial.
02:00
We were going to, that summer, put this show on.
02:06
I started to go to a couple of rehearsals,
02:07
and everybody else was at least in their 20s, and I was 17.
02:13
We did a lot of, I don't know, breathing and hugging,
02:17
that kind of stuff.
02:20
You were in a cult.
02:21
Yeah, it was kind of a cult.
02:22
It really, honestly, it was a little cult-y.
02:28
I got the sense that it probably wasn't going
02:30
to turn into anything really important or anything,
02:35
really profound.
02:38
I dropped out of it, and I said to my parents,
02:41
I'm gonna go to New York.
02:43
One of the sad things about Philadelphia,
02:45
which is a town that I love dearly,
02:47
is there's this giant magnet,
02:49
very very close called New York that's just sucking
02:54
the energetic creative life sometimes out of it,
02:59
and I was one of those people that just went,
03:01
I can't stay right here.
03:07
I applied to a summer program
03:10
which was The Circle and the Square,
03:13
I guess it was like high school workshop
03:16
or something like that.
03:17
I slept on my sister's couch.
03:18
My sister had been in New York for many many years.
03:21
My mother was a New Yorker.
03:23
I literally got on the train with a suitcase and a dream
03:29
and landed here and started waiting tables
03:32
and went to Circle in the Square
03:33
and had the best time enjoying
03:38
what was kind of the center of the universe
03:43
in 1976 and then beyond.
03:49
You talk about waiting tables.
03:50
One thing I did find out about you, Allstate Cafe
03:55
on the upper west side, that was your first,
03:57
which supposedly was the inspiration for Cheers?
04:00
Yeah, yeah, yeah.
04:01
The Allstate Cafe was on 72nd Street.
04:05
It was actually my second job.
04:08
My first job was at Fiorello's Roman Cafe,
04:11
which was on 63rd.
04:13
I was a busboy,
04:14
eventually made it to waiter,
04:18
then fucked up and got shuffled back to busboy.
04:22
What was the fuck-up?
04:24
I had ...
04:27
Stolen some money?
04:29
No, didn't steal money, no.
04:31
I didn't steal money, but I,
04:35
the deal with that place was that
04:37
the service had to be done on tray.
04:40
They were very big on tray service, right?
04:43
At the Allstate, where I subsequently worked,
04:46
you could stack as many plate as you wanted up your arm.
04:48
That was no problem.
04:50
At Fiorello's, which was a fancier restaurant,
04:53
you had to put things on a tray.
04:56
I had two hamburgers and one bottle of ketchup,
05:02
and I'll never forget this,
05:05
I was walking down the aisle towards the gentlemen
05:08
to deliver the two hamburgers and one bottle of ketchup.
05:12
I saw the ketchup start to,
05:13
I hadn't learned how to finesse the tray yet, really,
05:20
and the ketchup started to go like this, blam,
05:23
hit the terracotta.
05:26
It exploded all over this dude's white suit,
05:29
and I thought to myself, Well, I can't really deal
05:34
with the suit right now.
05:37
I gotta put the hamburgers down,
05:39
but what he saw was I just completely ruined his suit
05:43
and just kept blowing right on by.
05:45
He lost his shit, and went crazy
05:49
and the manager took me down into the office
05:54
at the end of the day and said,
05:56
You know, you're not ready to be a waiter, right?
05:59
I said, You're right, Phil, I'm not ready to be a waiter,
06:02
and he said, Here's what I'm gonna do.
06:06
You're gonna go back to busboy.
06:12
We're gonna give you a couple of shifts,
06:15
one or two shifts a week to see if you're ready
06:18
to make the step.
06:22
That's what happened to me.
06:23
Eventually I left that job and ended up
06:27
at the Allstate Cafe which was, you're right.
06:30
One of the patrons of the Allstate Cafe,
06:34
which was a magical place, honestly,
06:38
this was 1977 I think, but the time I started working there,
06:42
or late '76.
06:44
It was the real version of Cheers.
06:48
People from all walks of life walking down
06:51
into this basement kind of joint.
06:54
The upper west side was a very different place
06:57
than it is now.
06:58
It just had a vibe that was undeniable a jukebox,
07:03
and feeling of family, of home and comradery.
07:12
Jimmy Burrows, who was one of the creators of Cheers
07:16
had been a guy from the Allstate,
07:18
and he had gone to L.A.,
07:20
and I think had done some other shows at that point.
07:23
I don't really know the basis of it,
07:26
but Cheers ended up being set in Boston,
07:28
but whether or not this is confirmed, I don't know.
07:32
You must know it.
07:33
I feel like when I looked at Cheers,
07:35
I always thought to myself, Okay this has to have been
07:37
based on the Allstate.
07:40
Yeah.
07:41
There's conflicting accounts.
07:44
Oh, are there?
07:45
Well, I mean did Burrows I guess,
07:46
Burrows spend a lot of time there
07:48
and he said he got inspired by a lot.
07:50
But he says no, he based it on another place?
07:54
It was sort of a mashup.
07:57
Right.
07:58
He said he got the idea for Cliff Claven from there,
08:04
because he said every bar has a know-it-all.
08:06
It wasn't me.
08:09
(audience laughs)
08:11
You're the guy dropping ketchup on the floor.
08:13
Exactly.
08:14
You're there.
08:16
You do Animal House, right?
08:18
You're still working there when you do Animal House, right?
08:23
Yeah.
08:24
Then you do Diner which,
08:30
were you playing a version of yourself in Diner?
08:32
Sort of like a ...
08:36
I don't know.
08:38
Young, spoiled-ish kind of ...
08:41
I don't think I was young and spoiled.
08:43
But you're East Coast sort of waspy guy?
08:48
(audience laughs)
08:49
I am an East Coast, I'm definitely a wasp.
08:52
I'm definitely from the East Coast,
08:54
no doubt about those two things.
08:57
I think that in terms of the character in Diner,
09:03
I think he came from a slightly different tradition
09:11
than my family, or certainly been about how I felt myself.
09:20
He was a little more born with a silver spoon
09:26
and kind of like the family's gonna take care of everything.
09:30
Right.
09:31
Kind of guy.
09:32
That was really not my upbringing.
09:33
We had a big family.
09:36
We lived in a small house.
09:40
My father, while he was an incredibly brilliant
09:43
and, in fact, famous guy, was not a wealthy guy,
09:47
and on his side of things.
09:50
My mother came from a lot of old New York money,
09:54
but my father's side of things,
09:56
they were not really wealthy.
09:57
We were not raised in any way in a preppy kind of way.
10:03
Fenwick is a preppy sort of character.
10:06
That was not part of my experience.
10:11
That being said,
10:14
I feel like with every single character,
10:17
my concept is that you use yourself and you lose yourself,
10:23
so there were things about Fenwick
10:26
that I definitely could use and that came from me.
10:31
When I was walking in his shoes,
10:34
I don't really think I felt like I was doing me.
10:39
In fact, my whole template for wanting to act
10:44
and for any of the performances that I've done,
10:48
the best ones have been the ones where I go,
10:52
I didn't really feel like I was being me.
10:55
I felt like I was embodying somebody else.
10:58
Interesting side note about that character, just sadly,
11:02
is that he ended up being murdered.
11:05
The guy he was based on?
11:06
Yeah, the guy it was based on, yeah.
11:09
Barry based that whole movie on all of those characters
11:14
either prolifery or directly on people that he had known.
11:17
Barry Levinson, that has directed and wrote that,
11:22
and the legend of Fenwick was that he got into some
11:27
kind of shady stuff,
11:29
and was at some deal or something like that
11:34
at somebody's house and
11:40
somebody shot him,
11:43
and he went, Well now you got me mad,
11:45
and started taking his jacket off,
11:47
and the guy shot him again.
11:49
Wow.
11:50
Yeah.
11:51
Whether it's true or not, I don't know.
11:52
Let's shift gears for a second to the third movie,
11:54
the next movie after that is Footloose which
11:57
you talk about use yourself.
12:00
I'm going to ask you two questions.
12:02
The legend that it is the studio head of the time,
12:06
Sherry Lansing.
12:07
It was Dawn Steel.
12:08
Dawn Steel, excuse me, said you wouldn't work in the role
12:12
because you were not, and these are her words, not mine,
12:15
fuckable.
12:16
Yeah, that's true.
12:18
That's true?
12:19
Yeah.
12:20
(audience laughs)
12:21
Okay.
12:22
(audience laughs)
12:29
Yeah man, I ... that was it.
12:33
Did you ever say to her afterwards,
12:35
Check this out?
12:39
No, what happened was she, the director, her boss,
12:47
and the producer Daniel Melnick,
12:49
both were very big champions of me after I'd been through
12:53
all this very long arduous audition process,
13:00
and she just didn't see it.
13:02
She didn't see it, and that was, that was the thing
13:08
that she didn't get.
13:09
Was she looking at dailies or the finished?
13:10
She was looking at some audition,
13:15
I actually don't even know she'd seen anything
13:18
I'd put on tape.
13:19
I think she was looking at Diner, probably,
13:22
and looking at whatever other film they had on me.
13:26
It's a funny story, and it's a great story.
13:32
It sounds so like kind of terrifying
13:39
and a terrible thing to say,
13:41
but God bless her.
13:42
She was running a fucking studio.
13:45
That's her right to say,
13:48
the fact that that even becomes a negative against her,
13:58
to me, is almost in a way, kind of deeply sexist
14:02
because we're afraid of a woman in power
14:06
being able to actually say something like that.
14:11
I think it's cool.
14:12
In retrospect, of course I didn't like to hear it,
14:14
but in retrospect I was like, Yeah, good for you.
14:16
she didn't get it.
14:17
There's been 100,000 dudes that have cast movies and gone,
14:22
maybe they didn't put it exactly,
14:24
no she did put it in that way,
14:26
but maybe they never came out and said,
14:28
Man, I don't think so.
14:29
The thing is that she said what she felt about it,
14:36
the producer and the director of that film
14:40
decided to prove it to her, so they set up a screen test
14:46
where we did a whole bunch of scenes,
14:49
romantic scenes, dramatic scenes including sort of a weird,
14:58
it would be like an 80s almost video-type montage
15:01
where I would just walk out in different outfits
15:03
and they'd play music, and I just went ...
15:04
(audience laughs)
15:06
They did a whole crazy thing with my hair.
15:10
It was a whirlwind weekend for me.
15:15
I was actually doing a play at the time
15:18
on Broadway called Slab Boys, I'll never forget.
15:22
The play was a great experience.
15:25
I'd done a whole shit-ton of theater.
15:27
That's really where my heart was.
15:30
I was working with Sean Penn and Val Kilmer
15:33
and Jackie O'Hearly and Brian Benben.
15:36
We were doing this Scottish play,
15:37
and on this one wacky weekend, I had to do this
15:41
Footloose audition screen test.
15:47
The first thing that they showed her was not the scenes,
15:50
not the any of the dramatic or the romantic stuff.
15:55
They just showed her this montage and videos
15:59
were just exploding into our consciousness
16:03
with Michael Jackson, and all that kind of stuff.
16:07
She looked at this montage, and halfway through it,
16:09
got up and walked out and said, Okay, you can cast him.
16:13
So that was it.
16:16
Is it true you hate going to weddings
16:17
because people always play that song?
16:19
That's true.
16:20
I don't, and I'll tell you why.
16:22
(audience laughs)
16:25
I have a reason for this.
16:27
I'm tired of winning those awards.
16:28
I'm tired, that's why.
16:29
No no no, I love the movie.
16:32
I'm very happy for the movie.
16:33
Love the song, everything about it.
16:36
If I go to a wedding, I want the wedding to be
16:41
about the bride and the groom, right?
16:44
If I'm there, they gotta be people that I care about.
16:49
When they put the song on, and it usually happens
16:53
after everybody is half in the bag, right?
16:56
It's not gonna happen early on in the ceremony, right?
17:00
It's gonna happen around 10:30, 10:45.
17:07
All of a sudden, the wedding becomes about me
17:11
because people immediately look to me,
17:14
and they form a circle around me,
17:18
and they start to clap,
17:21
and they want me to start jumping around
17:25
like a trained money, and I'm thinking,
17:27
It's not about me, you know what I mean?
17:29
It's about those two people.
17:32
I find that embarrassing.
17:33
I don't like to, I'm happy to take,
17:37
look, I'm here, I'm taking the focus, that's great.
17:41
A very giant part of my life is totally fine
17:46
and, in fact, hungers on being the center of attention.
17:50
Nothing about being an actor that is about this.
17:54
At somebody else's wedding?
17:56
No.
17:58
Another true or false question about music.
18:01
Someone told me that the first gig you played
18:03
was Liz Taylor's birthday party?
18:06
Well, it's one of the early gigs that we played,
18:08
and it was a complete nightmare, oh my God.
18:12
Michael Jackson's there?
18:13
Michael Jackson was there.
18:14
Thank God my brother got a song out of it
18:16
because we put this band together,
18:20
we were playing in tiny little clubs,
18:22
we had no records, I'd written a bunch of songs,
18:25
he'd written a bunch of songs.
18:27
We were playing in 150-seat coffee houses,
18:33
and stuff like that.
18:34
Somehow this request came in for the Bacon Brothers
18:38
to play Elizabeth Taylor's, I think it was
18:42
40th birthday, 50th birthday?
18:45
I don't know, it was a birthday bash
18:46
that was gonna be seen by billions of people worldwide.
18:51
Michael Jackson was gonna be there,
18:53
and this artist and that artist,
18:54
and it was this really super over-the-top,
18:57
I actually should go back and look at it,
18:59
it was like a crazy over-the-top production.
19:03
There was a young up-and-coming country singer,
19:08
Martina McBride, which has now gone on to become
19:11
a giant start in the world of country music.
19:15
They paired us with her, and we were gonna do a song
19:20
with Martina, and it was an amazing experience for us.
19:24
They flew us out to L.A.
19:26
We had this great rehearsal with Martina.
19:30
She sang the shit out of a song that I wrote,
19:34
and I was like, Oh my God, this is amazing.
19:36
I'm standing backstage,
19:39
and right before I'm about to go out,
19:42
Rosanne Barr goes by.
19:47
She's dressed as Cleopatra,
19:53
and she's being carried on a giant platter
19:57
by a bunch of nubian slaves,
20:00
and they're all covered in gold, and stuff like that.
20:03
We go out, and we take our spot,
20:06
and I'm playing at that point,
20:07
and I'm very very new into playing live music.
20:11
It was really new for me.
20:12
I loved playing, but,
20:15
and I'm still not much of a guitar player,
20:17
but at this point, I was really really new into it.
20:20
Somehow my 12-string guitar got completely out of tune,
20:26
and I have a theory that somebody must have
20:29
either hit the guitar or done it just as kind of a joke.
20:33
Malcolm Forbes.
20:34
Yeah, there you go.
20:36
Now we're ready to go, and I hit a couple of strings,
20:39
and I go, Oh my God, this is the worst.
20:42
This is a nightmare.
20:44
I turn to my brother and said, Mike, I'm way our of tune.
20:46
There was no time.
20:48
The whole thing was live.
20:49
I couldn't retune it.
20:50
It ended up being terrifying, just an absolute disaster,
20:55
and we really kind of shit the bed.
20:57
(audience laughs)
20:59
It's a medical term.
21:01
Yeah, sorry.
21:03
It was a great, one of those great life lessons,
21:09
and we picked ourselves up after this terrible experience
21:13
and tried to go back into this studio
21:17
and try to fix the track a little bit,
21:21
but yeah, Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Jackson,
21:24
and Roseanne Barr.
21:25
And Roseanne Barr.
21:26
I want to go back to Footloose for a minute because
21:28
you've talked about this
21:31
in different ways at different times,
21:33
and I think that as we were talking earlier
21:36
there's life that whether one's a performer
21:39
or what one's career is, and sort of moments that happen.
21:43
After Footloose came out,
21:47
you talked about where you were in terms of this
21:55
Hollywood landscape.
21:59
You were in that teeing area with Brat Pack-y sort of
22:03
Tom Cruise-y thing.
22:05
The phrase you've used is this sort of,
22:10
then you entered your mid-career meltdown
22:12
where you self-sabotaged yourself.
22:17
I want to talk about it,
22:19
because I feel like there's something very rich there,
22:24
especially when you think of a lot of guys,
22:27
we sort of have these visions and dreams and ambitions
22:34
of what we want to achieve.
22:36
We sort of get there,
22:38
and then we dynamite it, right?
22:42
You're here now.
22:46
You've had a brilliant career,
22:48
but when you look back at that,
22:49
what was happening?
22:52
Why?
22:54
It's a good question.
22:55
I think that I had an idea about the kind of actor
23:02
that I wanted to be, and the idea was based
23:04
on a lot of stuff that I was looking at.
23:09
It was school, it was things that I was reading.
23:13
I started out because I wanted to make money, get girls,
23:20
and be a pop idol and be on the cover of Tiger Beat.
23:26
I don't think any of you remembers what Tiger Beat is,
23:28
but you can Google it.
23:31
Bobby Sherman, when I was a really little kid,
23:37
that's what I wanted, that pop success.
23:43
Girls and money and stuff.
23:47
Then, I started to act and really take it seriously
23:52
and study it, and embrace it.
23:57
I was very young when I made that transition,
24:00
probably by the time I moved to New York
24:02
when I was 17 or 18, I was, Fuck Tiger Beat.
24:06
I want to be deNiro, Pacino, Dustin Hoffman,
24:10
John Casales, John Voight, Meryl Streep, Raul Julia,
24:17
these are the people I want to be.
24:20
I'm on my way towards that goal through the theater
24:24
that I was doing through Diner,
24:26
through those kinds of things.
24:29
Then Footloose happens, and I'm Bobby Sherman again,
24:33
and I'm on the cover of Tiger Beat,
24:35
and I was 24 years old, and I was like,
24:37
This is exactly what I don't want.
24:40
yeah, I was rejecting it, and making choices that
24:48
were self-sabotaging.
24:52
If I had been a little smarter,
24:54
I would have realized that if something good is happening,
24:58
you probably better off just embracing it.
25:02
You're probably better off just working it
25:04
because chances are it's not gonna last forever.
25:09
I don't have hindsight.
25:11
I don't go, I wish if I had only, you know what I mean?
25:18
My theory is if you mess things up for yourself,
25:23
you pick it up and you find something else
25:27
and you keep looking down the road.
25:29
You've got kids now.
25:31
Two kids, yeah.
25:33
Basically at that age.
25:34
They are, yeah.
25:36
Do you ever look at them and think about
25:41
moments like this where ...
25:44
Sure.
25:45
What would you tell them?
25:46
I think about moments like this,
25:49
but I don't struggle too much with things
25:52
that I'm going to tell them.
25:54
I want them to do great and I want them to understand,
25:57
but I know that the idea that a parent sits you down one day
26:07
and says, Well kid, here's the one piece of information,
26:12
this is the one piece of information
26:14
that's gonna change your life.
26:15
That's the stuff of movies, you know?
26:17
That shit doesn't happen.
26:19
You mean movies lie?
26:20
Yeah, movies lie.
26:21
That's exactly what I mean.
26:24
I think you have to,
26:25
all I can do is communicate with them
26:29
on an ongoing basis and try to live by example,
26:33
try to have them see me and see my wife
26:38
and see what we do, but I don't ever look
26:42
at that one moment where it's all gonna come together.
26:47
I never had it, as a kid.
26:50
There was never one moment really
26:53
where somebody said to me, Well here's the thing.
26:57
But there's moments like,
26:59
if you look back and say, Son, this might be a moment.
27:06
It can be a moment.
27:08
I've got some wisdom here that I'm gonna apply to you.
27:10
That's true, there can be a moment.
27:11
Here's the other thing is that
27:15
I may think it's the moment,
27:18
and they may not think that, or conversely,
27:23
my kids have come to me and said to me,
27:27
Do you remember when you said to me this thing?
27:30
or whatever, or that night when this happened,
27:33
and I have no memory of it,
27:35
but it was important to them, you know.
27:37
To try to like come up with words of wisdom
27:42
is a short-term parenting solution that doesn't apply
27:50
in I don't think any kind of reality.
27:53
Were you afraid of success at that point?
27:55
I was, yeah, because success was scary.
27:58
Fame was scary.
28:01
It's so funny because I wanted it so badly.
28:03
I wanted it from the first time
28:05
I could ever even dream of it, I wanted it.
28:09
My father was famous.
28:11
People would stop him on the street and stuff.
28:15
I remember going, I gotta be more famous than him.
28:18
I got to.
28:20
He was a city planner?
28:21
He was a city planner, yeah, in Philadelphia.
28:24
He was on the cover of Time Magazine,
28:26
which I've never actually been on.
28:29
(audience laughs)
28:31
I remember so much being so focused on that, and on fame.
28:37
Then it was there, and then I was like, I don't know.
28:43
I had a difficult time with it.
28:46
I found something you said which was
28:50
part of being a man is learning to take responsibility
28:54
for your successes and failures.
28:55
You can't be blaming others or feeling jealous.
28:57
Seeing somebody else's success as your failure
28:59
is a cancerous way to live.
29:01
Right.
29:02
I guess I'm sort of staying on this because it's such a,
29:04
for all guys or any men or women in the room,
29:08
this is where they become that moment where
29:11
you achieve something, and for reasons we don't know,
29:13
we just sort of,
29:14
I call it the Bridge of the River Kwai moment,
29:16
like you just blow it up, and there it goes, right?
29:19
Right, but I think that the main thing is
29:22
that you have, it's very hard when you,
29:26
at any point in your life, to think that there's
29:30
still five years, 10 years, 20 years down the road,
29:33
because it all feels like it's gonna happen right now.
29:37
I was 24 when Footloose came out.
29:40
I knew that I was gonna be in this for a long haul,
29:43
but I certainly didn't think to myself, Well yeah,
29:45
well in 10 years it's gonna change,
29:47
and things are gonna go up and go down.
29:49
It's very hard to picture that when you're in
29:52
the middle of it.
29:53
I think hanging in there and,
29:58
if there's something that you really love to do
30:01
or you really feel that you're good at,
30:03
or you're really is giving you some kind of satisfaction,
30:10
which acting is and was for me.
30:14
With all this other stuff,
30:17
fame, ups and downs, careers, I mean
30:22
we haven't even discussed, Footloose was a great thing,
30:25
but the years afterwards were just like many years
30:30
of what I felt were personal disasters,
30:33
I created disasters.
30:35
You have to just say, I'm looking down the road.
30:38
Something is going to get better, and in the interim,
30:45
I really love what I'm doing.
30:48
Movies like Tremors?
30:49
Yeah, Tremors, right.
30:53
You've said you were standing on the street with Kyra
31:01
and losing your shit, realizing you were making a movie
31:04
about underground worms, right?
31:05
Yeah, exactly, I was just losing my shit.
31:06
I was going, I can't believe I'm making this movie.
31:08
It's about underground worms, and I thought I was
31:11
in a different place.
31:14
That's a very good example because then we go out
31:18
and make the movie.
31:19
The movie comes out, it's a bomb.
31:26
I go, Yeah, I was right.
31:28
I never should have made this.
31:30
Now it's even worse, because not only have I made it,
31:33
but not it's a year later, it's out, and it's a bomb.
31:38
Then you think that's the end of the story.
31:42
The movie becomes one of the first VHS hits,
31:51
cult VHS hits, and people love that movie.
31:57
I don't look at my movies.
31:59
I've been trying to lobby to remake the movie
32:03
because it's the only character I've done
32:07
that I really would like to explore 25 years later.
32:10
(audience laughs)
32:13
I've been really hoping to reboot it.
32:19
Is there a script?
32:20
There's no script.
32:21
There's no interest, frankly.
32:22
Not only is there no script ...
32:25
Not even a little bit of interest?
32:28
No interest.
32:29
Chinese money somewhere?
32:31
Believe me, nobody wants to do it, not with me at least.
32:34
I went back and I looked at it.
32:35
It's really good.
32:38
I was really proud of it.
32:41
I thought it was beautifully shot, very funny.
32:45
The people that have come up to me through the years
32:48
and said, I love that movie, and it's mostly out
32:49
in the heart land, not here and it's not in L.A.
32:52
Like in the rest of that ...
32:54
People are here in L.A. They just won't say it.
32:56
They won't say it, right.
32:57
The rest of the country is honest enough to tell me
33:01
that they like the movie.
33:02
It's a funny thing.
33:06
Sometimes things come around full circle,
33:09
so that's a perfect example.
33:12
(rock music)